Kathmandu School Of Law (KSL)
in co-operation with Center for Legal Research and Resource Development (CeLRRd)
E-Bulletin (Vol 50)
 


Admission Opened in One Year Interdisciplinary M. A. Program in Human Rights
and Conflict and International Humanitarian Laws

KSL announces admission- open  in one year interdisciplinary M.A program in Human Rights and Conflict and International Humanitarian Laws. Interested students holding Masters' Degree in any discipline are eligible to apply for the program. The last date for the submission of application form is 10 March, 2006. Classes will commence from 2 April, 2006.  For more information <click here>

Introducing M.A. Program in Human Rights and Conflict and International Humanitarian Laws

Kathmandu School of Law has initiated one year M.A programs so as to provide an academic environment for acquisition, application and dissemination of techno-academic knowledge and skills necessary to those who have interest in field of human rights and humanitarian laws and have been working under various disciplines in public life. This course aims to indoctrinate the scholars with the contemporary relevance of human rights, international humanitarian law generating human right culture as well as conflict prevention and humanitarian assistance in conflict-induced crisis. This initiation is taken in request and consultation with  International Committee of Red Cross Nepal, UN High Commission of Human Rights, European Union, South Asian Law Schools Forums and Danish Institute for Human Rights to train, support and groom young leaders who not only know, but also can implement humanitarian instruments at international, regional and national level. ICRC deserves our special appreciation in this regard for its invaluable cooperation from the very beginning of development of this program.

Subjects Offered  for M.A in Human Rights

Marks

1.       Human Rights Standards and Enforcement Mechanism

100

2.       Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

100

3.       Civil and Political Rights

100

4.       Gender and Disadvantaged Groups

100

5.       Field Research and Reporting

100

6.       Dissertation

100

Subjects Offered  for M.A in Conflict and International Humanitarian Laws

Marks

1.     International Humanitarian laws and implementation

100

2.       International Criminal Law and Court System

100

3.       Conflict Resolution (Principles, norms and practice

100

4.       Report Writing and Field Research

100

5.       Field Research and Reporting

100

6.       Dissertation

100

 This academic course consists of regular classes as well as the three residential workshop, outdoor studies and institutional visits that form an integral part of this academic course. There will be four taught classes per week of 2:30 hours each. <click here for detail of the program>
Organizations and Institutions working in the similar field of human rights and conflict issues are particularly requested to disseminate this announcement to every interested eligible candidate of its organization. 

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KSL inputs to NHRC for Recommendations on Government 2nd Report on ICESCR

National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) Nepal organized a discussion with various representatives of civil society, non-governmental and academic institution on 2nd February 2006 to collect their inputs for providing commission's recommendations to the Government on Second Periodic Report of Nepal to the Committee on International Convention on Economic Social and Cultural Rights.

In the discussion programme, representing Kathmandu School of Law, Assistant Professor Rabindra Bhattarai provided inputs to the Commission for its consideration on recommending the government. He pointed out that the draft of the report lapses many important aspects of the reality on the status of implementation of ESC rights in Nepal.

He stressed that in the specific reporting on the article 1 of the covenant is misleading. Right to self-determination is the foundations of all rights and it is to be understood as the root of the all rights. The report has not been able to even mention the sovereignty rights of the Nepali people under article 3 of the Constitution of the Kingdom of Nepal and disturbances on its exercise in recent years. He said that the Commission should make the government clear on the connotations and implications of the provisions of the covenant. Mr. Bhattarai recommended the Commission to include legal, judicial and administrative provisions on the right to self-determination of Nepali people; status of their implementations and hindrances.

Commenting on the report under article 2 and 3 of the Covenant, Mr. Bhattarai said "though the government said there is granted equality, the citizenship on the basis of their motherhood is not granted to Nepali children and there are several discriminatory legal provisions in Nepalese laws as substantiated by various studies, but the report has failed to mention this reality". Adding, Mr. Bhattarai explicitly spelled out to eliminate existing discriminating provision and practices.

Commenting on the reporting on right to work, Mr. Bhattarai indicated that the information included in the draft report is misinforming and incomplete. It has partly failed to demonstrate the pragmatic situation of right to work as outlined by the presentation on the theme; Domestic employment opportunities and employments in abroad. Similarly, pointing out to the lacuna of report on social security issues, he said although the constitution has guaranteed the right to food, but in realistic sense these fundamental rights have not been preserved as still many people go hungry.

He also indicated the data given in describing context of right to education are misleading. The Commission is suggested to view an assessment of data on education by KSL in this regard before submitting its recommendations to the government. Further suggestions of KSL were to omit unnecessary details which are irrelevant and to explicitly give the government specific mitigating programmes where the challenges are envisioned.

There were more than 30 representatives from various organisations on the programme. Members of the Commission Ms. Shilu Singh and Mr. Sudeep Pathak and Ex Member Dr. Gauri Shankar Lal Dash were also present in the discussion programme. Nepal had access the United Nations International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in the year 1991 and submitted its initial report in the year 1999. The second report is expected to be presented within first half of the year 2006.

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Media workers to promote peace and national interest

Journalists in an interaction programme expressed their commitment to be sensitive in news reporting, promote democratization and human rights culture and act as a mediator in resolving conflict. This commitment was expressed in a two-day orientation programme jointly organized by Kathmandu School of Law (KSL) and Radio Sagarmatha on 3rd February, 2006 in Kathmandu in financial support of Royal Danish Embassy. Twenty journalists and media workers, mostly the reporters and correspondents of national daily newspapers, government-owned media and media workers of local commercial and community FM stations had taken part in the programme. The primary objective of the programme was to generate deepening awareness on the need of 'building peace through transformation of the conflict', and to sensitize them to be socially responsive to the issues and present more peace friendly coverage, news and stories and contribute to promote peace and national interest. During the programme, they were made aware about the peace-building process and their role to contribute to the negotiation process by narrowing differences and bringing the conflicting parties in a common discussion forum to resolve their differences by non-violent means.

The concept of inclusive democracy was one of the core issues of discussion. Assoc. Professor Yubaraj Sangroula presented the concept which emphasized the need of 'inclusion of economic and social democracy, benefiting all segments of the population' for successful transformation of violent conflict. He shared that the need of the hour is the 'consolidation of democracy and constitutionalism' for transformation of the conflict which is not possible without the inclusion in democracy. "The concept of "inclusive democracy" has three dimensions, i.e. political, economical and social. Politically, the concept of inclusiveness in democracy believes that the citizens in a ‘collective body’ share the political power of the state. Individually, everybody’s stake or share is equal; it is neither more nor less. All citizens in exercise of political power are equal. The political dimension of inclusiveness is, therefore, founded on the equal distribution of political power among all citizens. This means that a society to possess ‘inclusiveness in democracy’ ought to satisfy the needs of all segments of the society", he urged. According to him, economically, the concept of inclusiveness in democracy advocates for the equal distribution of private property, income and wealth, while equality of wage and social dignity of male and female workers and the larger realm of human rights is reflected on the social dimension of the inclusiveness in democracy.

Importance of scientific mindedness in journalism was another topic for discussion. Assistant Professor of KSL Mr. Khagendra Prasai highlighted on the need of scientific mindedness in professional work of journalism. Under this topic issues like scientific approach of professional work, open and critical mindedness, nature of information and its relation to facts and opinion, and role of evidence in establishing truth by facts were discussed.

The second day was particularly focussed on peace journalism. It dealt on general idea of journalism, notion and principles of peace journalism, understanding peace and the conflict, objects and styles of peace journalism, difference between traditional and new approaches of conflict reporting and sensitive issues under peace journalism. Discussion was held on the role of journalists in conflict transformation and during conflict reporting as responsive fourth estate. Journalist Raghu Mainali and Ghamaraaj Luitel had facilitated the discussion. In the first session, discussions were held on research findings of KSL, presented by Mr. Pradeep Pathak. During the discussion, participants shared that the programmes had been effective to guide them in proper direction in the present crisis situation. They admitted that the programme had been successful in sharpening their skills to promote pro-peace and pro-democratic information dissemination. They also shared that the programme enhanced their skill to access the situation and take a conflict-resolution approach. At the end of each programme, a conclusion was made that in disseminating news, journalists should pay special attention to the cause of a problem and its consequences and the impact caused by the armed conflict.

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Kathmandu School of Law          / Telephone : 977-01-634455/6634663, 2042268
Dadhikot, Bhaktapur                   /   Fax           : 977-01-634801
Kathmandu, Nepal                     /   E-mail       : info@ksl.edu.np        Web   :  www.ksl.edu.np